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Backups

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Summary: The backup feature is designed to preserve the integrity of references as you would expect when you wish to restore a data structure to a previous state of affairs.
Introduction
When you back up a Node, a structure of nodes, a complete hierarchy, or even the Workspace, all existing references are stored in the resulting JSON file.
When you restore a workspace backup, the current workspace is replaced with the backup.
Now, let’s see what happens when you restore anything other than a workspace, that is, any of the data structures contained in the workspace. What we want to analyze is what happens with references that may be present in the structure, in particular, with the different types of references.
Outgoing References
Outgoing references are kept intact no matter if the original structure of nodes still exists or not.
For example, in a Task set up to run a Backtesting Session, the Trading Process Instance references the Trading Bot Multi-Time-Frame process, the Trading System Reference references a Trading System, and the Trading Engine Reference references the Trading Engine. These are all outgoing references relative to the structure of nodes that make up a Task.
As the capture above shows, when restoring the backup of a Task, the three outgoing references are maintained, even when the original task has not been deleted.
Incoming References
Incoming references are restored only when the original structure of nodes is deleted before restoring the backup.
Let’s take a Trading System as an example. Trading systems usually have several incoming references originating at different testing and live trading sessions.
The capture above shows that restoring a backup of a trading system when the original definition is still in the workspace causes the incoming references to be lost. This is because the backup is restored with new IDs on each node.
However, as the capture below shows, if the original structure of nodes is deleted before the backup is restored, then the incoming references are restored as well. This is because deleting the original structure releases the IDs of the nodes involved and allows recreating the structure with the same IDs each of the nodes used to have.
Internal References
Internal references remain to be internal references only when the original structure of nodes is deleted before restoring the backup. If the original structure of nodes is present, then the references will point to the original nodes on the original structure of nodes.
Let’s see what happens when we restore a backup of a Shapes node without deleting the original node first:
As expected, the references from vertices in the restored backup do not point to the points in the same structure, but instead, point to the original points in the original structure.
On the other hand, if the original structure of nodes is deleted before restoring the backup, then the references point to the nodes within the same structure:
Conclusion
The backup feature is designed to preserve the integrity of references as you would expect when you wish to restore a data structure to a previous state of affairs.
However, the tool’s particular behavior when restoring a backup without deleting the original structure may be of use on certain occasions. In such cases, the backup feature behaves differently than the clone feature.
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Clones

Productivity Tools — TOC

You just read page 1 in the topic.

1. Backups

2. Clones

3. Shares

4. Screen Capture and Sharing